Skip navigation

Nano Bible donated to Smithsonian

The Bible is only 0.5 square millimeters – much smaller than the head of a pin. At the Zisapel Nanoelectronics Center the text was etched with a focused beam of energetic gallium ions. (Photo courtesy Technion-Israel Institute of Technology)

The Bible is only 0.5 square millimeters – much smaller than the head of a pin. The text was etched with a focused beam of energetic gallium ions. (Photos courtesy Technion-Israel Institute of Technology)

Smithsonian Secretary David J. Skorton will accept a Nano Bible from Peretz Lavie, president of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History on Oct. 30. The Nano Bible will be part of the Smithsonian Libraries collection, housed in the Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology at the National Museum of American History.

The Nano Bible was produced by researchers at the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. Engraved on a gold-plated silicon chip the size of a sugar grain, the bible’s text consists of more than 1.2 million letters carved with a focused beam of gallium ions. The text engraved on the chip must be magnified 10,000 times to be readable.

The Nano Bible

The Nano Bible

“We are excited to enrich the Libraries’ collections with this marvelous gift, which marries one of the world’s oldest and most significant texts with one of the newest technologies of the 21st century,” said Nancy E. Gwinn, director of Smithsonian Libraries. “As one of our principal values is to share our collections with the public, it is appropriate that the only copy in the United States be located here, as part of the national collections.”

At less than 100 atoms thick, the Nano Bible demonstrates how people can process, store and share data through tiny dimensions using nanotechnology. The Smithsonian’s Nano Bible will be the first one received in the United States.

 

Tags: ,

  • Virtuous2012

    I did not see a Forward link. People would like to send this to family and friends. But not everyone is, or WANTS TO BE on social media! Please include a Forward link on email from Smithsonian.

    • briire

      Click the orange plus sign square to the above-right of the comments area, then select “Email” and it will work as a mail link.

  • Jeanne Smith

    How would anyone even know it’s a Bible if it’s that tiny? Also, how could one read it?

  • This is awesome! Any chance we can get a picture of what the text looks like an 10k magnification?